Blog

21st Century Workshop Creative Enhancer & 3D Printing

Posted by on Feb 25, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off on 21st Century Workshop Creative Enhancer & 3D Printing

21st Century Workshop Creative Enhancer & 3D Printing

21st Century Workshop Creative Enhancer & 3D Printing RSVP your details here  or sales@virtuallearning.com.sg or call 65669606 / 96804618 RSVP your details here  or sales@virtuallearning.com.sg or call 65669606 /...

read more

Top Tips To Promote Digital Learning

Posted by on Feb 19, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off on Top Tips To Promote Digital Learning

Top Tips To Promote Digital Learning With online connectivity and hosting of resources offering businesses exciting tools with which to train their employees, there has arguably never been a better time for staff training. But much like teachers dealing with uncooperative pupils, managers may find that merely providing access to learning resources isn’t enough – especially if you need staff to pursue this enlightenment in their spare time, it is important to create an atmosphere that encourages and rewards this learning. With this in mind, here are a few tips on promoting digital learning among your staff: Encourage a culture of learning A full-hearted adoption of new methods of learning and working will often require a change of mindsets, particularly for the most stubborn of workers, and this can be transmitted to them by their colleagues, coworkers and managers if these parties are willing to highlight the benefits and advantages that these new paths can bring. Provide support When it comes to technology, the landscape is changing so rapidly that most of us will struggle to keep up with new developments, no matter how ‘tech’ savvy we may once have been. Make sure that staff have the support they need to pursue digital learning initiatives, even if they are doing so in their spare time. This may be something as simple as access to a laptop, or working case studies that they can use to relate what they learn to their own tasks. Feedback is key to the learning loop Virtual learning tools have had a massive democratising impact on education and as such, it is no longer good enough to view it as a passive, top-down process. People who are active and engaged learn the best, and a great way of ensuring such participation is with a proper feedback system in place. Learning should be like a loop, in which the recipients of lessons – be they virtual or not – can the contribute to formulating improvements in the system. Not only does this help to improve the efficiency of the learning programme for future participants, it is also a great way of ensuring that everyone has fully understood and absorbed the lessons at...

read more

More Schools Bringing 3D Printing Technology Into Their Classrooms

Posted by on Feb 6, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off on More Schools Bringing 3D Printing Technology Into Their Classrooms

More Schools Bringing 3D Printing Technology Into Their Classrooms

More schools are bringing 3D printing technology into their classrooms. With the number growing in the last two years, one supplier estimates that there are around 20 schools in Singapore with 3D printers. More schools are bringing 3D printing technology into their classrooms. SINGAPORE: More schools are bringing 3D printing technology into their classrooms. With the number growing in the last two years, one supplier estimates that there are around 20 schools in Singapore with 3D printers. The idea of using 3D printers in class is no longer uncommon. Ngee Ann Secondary School bought such a printer in August last year for about S$2,900. Vincent Tang, senior teacher (Design & Technology) at Ngee Ann Secondary School, said: “With this technology, we are able to excite the students more and when they are excited, they are also interested in the subject. With that, we’ve observed that they’ve come up with better designs. “Once we get them excited about Design & Technology and the designing part, they get very carried away, and they will continue to improve and refine their design.” The printer has exposed students to new technology. Mohamed Kasshif Mohamed Riaz, a Ngee Ann Secondary School student, said: “Technology is always progressive. I get to see new technology and I can experience it first-hand before students of other schools experience it.” It has helped them polish their design and creative-thinking skills. Another Ngee Ann Secondary School student, Brena Cheong, said: “I actually want to print out accessories, because it’s easy to make — and… they don’t take much time.” Aside from using the 3D printer to help students in their work, teachers have also used the printer for other things. For example, they have made souvenirs which they gave out last year during the school’s open house. They included a key chain, a ring and a whistle. The teachers are planning to train their counterparts from other schools to use the printer and to introduce it to their students. Anthony Ong, director of A-Main Objectives, which is a supplier of 3D printers, said: “The reason why 3D printers have been used frequently of late is due to the release of patents of fuse deposition manufacturing, the expiring of patents in 2013. That makes 3D printers very affordable for the mass market.“ New Town Secondary School is another school that has just started to tap the 3D printing technology. It bought a 3D printer in December 2013 for about S$7,000, and plans to use it in class in April this year. Alfred Goh, head of department (Craft & Technology) at New Town Secondary School, said: “We can tell our students that firstly, this is a privilege and not all schools have it.” He added that the school expects the students to make full use of it and to enrich their own learning. At the same time, the school has set other goals for the printer, including opening it up to non-Normal (Technical) students and teachers in other departments. Mr Goh said: “Teachers can print out the oxygen molecule and the carbon molecule, and… put them together to form the carbon monoxide molecule. I think it would be a great visual aid for students who are visual or kinaesthetic learners.” And like the unlimited possibilities of 3D printing, schools hope the...

read more

Dell To Sell 3D Printers

Posted by on Feb 4, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off on Dell To Sell 3D Printers

Dell To Sell 3D Printers

Dell to sell 3D printers   A Makerbot Replicator 2XDell will start selling 3D printers in the US on February 20. Photo courtesy: AFP RELAXNEWS/ Dell/Makerbot (Relaxnews) – The PC company is partnering with Makerbot to offer both printers and 3D scanners, starting in February. The momentum behind 3D printing and the claims that the technology is set to usher in a second industrial revolution have just increased with the announcement that Dell is to start stocking Makerbot devices. Initially, six models, priced from $949 to $6499, will go on sale and Dell is marketing them not at consumers, but at startups and at small-to-medium sized US businesses. But as well as Makerbot products, Dell will also be offering tweaked versions of its workstation computers, optimized for working with 3D printers, digitizers and scanners. In other words, what IT types like to call an “end-to-end solution.’ Although initially confined to the US, Dell hopes to start reselling the Makerbot line in other countries as the year progresses. “At Dell we strive to arm start-ups, designers and engineers with the powerful, reliable and cutting-edge technology they need to succeed,” said Andy Rhodes, executive director, Dell Precision workstations. “With the addition of MakerBot’s 3D printers and scanners to Dell’s workstation portfolio, our customers can now bring their innovative prototypes to life much more quickly and affordably.” And although the devices are being targeted initially at the design, engineering and architectural community, Makerbot hopes that the partnership will help bring 3D printing into the public consciousness. “Partnering with Dell is another step in building out the MakerBot 3D Printing Ecosystem that makes 3D printing easy and accessible for everyone,” said Bre Pettis, CEO of MakerBot. Dell’s 3D printing site will go live on February...

read more

IDA plans to introduce programming lessons in public schools to boost the economy

Posted by on Jan 16, 2014 in Blog | Comments Off on IDA plans to introduce programming lessons in public schools to boost the economy

According to the Straits Times, about 1,500 students have been taught “advanced computing concepts” through IDA’s school programs. At Radin Mas Primary School, Nan Chiau High, and Greenview Secondary School, students are taught to use 3D design software and 3D printers to create prototypes. Meanwhile, Hwa Chong Institution and Dunman High have introduced programming to teenagers, with Dunman exposing students to Python, a popular language for creating web apps as well as statistical and scientific research. These schools all belong to the middle-to-upper tier in Singapore’s public education system – lauded as among the world’s best in math and science – with Hwa Chong in particular representing an elite school. As technical skills increasingly become a pathway to sustainable careers, it is hoped that IDA can equalize the field by giving students from less prestigious schools more opportunities to pick up programming. Private classes are available Private education providers have proliferated in Singapore, offering a variety of workshops ranging from 3D printing to hardware tinkering to app creation – which has unfortunately been touted as the next great internet marketing scheme. According to private IT education vendor  more parents are recognizing the value of technical competency in the modern economy, and they want their kids to build a foundation at an early age. For the company, this has resulted in an increase in sign-ups for classes at a 30 percent annual rate in the past two years. “[Parents want their kids] exposed to this, so it makes it easier for them to make a career choice earlier. We also see many polytechnic and university students coming in because they found it challenging when they directly face programming in college first,” said one of the trainers in an interview with Good Morning Singapore. A major impetus for the push in both countries is a shortage of technical talent – the lifeblood of the tech startup scene – that are product creators instead of just system maintainers. Tight immigration policies in both nations are also resulting in an inward look to nurture talent at the grassroots. In Singapore, the challenge doesn’t lie just in developing technical know-how. It’s even more difficult to convince young people that the engineering path is one worth pursuing, rather than one to fall back on when opportunities for more prestigious careers in law, finance, or medicine appear out of...

read more

Educate & Empower students to create interesting 3D

Posted by on Dec 17, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Educate & Empower students to create interesting 3D

Educate & Empower students to create interesting 3D Models Google SketchUp Modelling Course – Revolutionising the Classroom New Insight : In the past, students learn to design the 3D models without the capability of visualising in its final 3D form (that is printing the model). Innova will provide that capability today for the schools to realise five 3D models that the school have designed through this course – by using its in-house 3D printer. This enhances the course for the students as they can see and feel the physical 3D model realised. Please contact – Mr Lee Kam Fai — 96804618 W : www.virtuallearning.com.sg E: sales@virtuallearning.com.sg To view — 3D Training...

read more

Medical uses of 3D printing

Posted by on Dec 17, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Medical uses of 3D printing

Medical uses of 3D printing We’ve heard of 3D-printed replacement parts for vintage cars As the year draws to an end, here’s one technology which will surely be the talk of the world next year. The technology is3D printing, which will continue to affect our lives in ways we haven’t thought of before. We’ve heard of 3D-printed replacement parts for vintage cars and how the technology may be used to replicate firearms, we often don’t value the role of the technology in medical cases. Take the case of 20-month old Kaiba. The child had difficulty breathing with his collapsed bronchus blocking the flow of air to his lungs. His parents April and Bryan Gionfriddo found hope at the University of Michigan, where they were told a new technology could help their child. Kaiba’s parents contacted Dr Glenn Green, associate professor of paediatric otolaryngology at the University of Michigan. Soon after, a specially-designed splint was placed in Kaiba. The splint was sewn around Kaiba’s airway to expand the bronchus and give it a skeleton to aid proper growth. Over about three years, the splint will be reabsorbed by the body, according to the New England Journal of Medicine. The splint was created directly from a CT scan of Kaiba’s trachea/bronchus, integrating an image-based computer model with laser-based 3D printing to produce the splint. Kaiba was off ventilator support 21 days after the procedure. It’s been a couple of years and Kaiba has not had breathing trouble since then. The Belgium-based Materialise, a global leader in 3D printing, guided the team at University of Michigan with its specialised software. Likewise, 3D printing has been helping surgeons perform reconstructive surgery in certain trauma cases, medical journals...

read more

Exploring the artistic possibilities with 3D-printing

Posted by on Dec 17, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Exploring the artistic possibilities with 3D-printing

Exploring the artistic possibilities with 3D-printing

Exploring the artistic possibilities with 3D-printing New fabrication technologies may have virtually infinite applications in the near future, from medicineto music to even underwear, but if we’re really going to get comfortable with 3D-printed plastics, it’s useful to find them in those handy little desktop buddies – our fidget toys that we constantly turn to for relief in moments of frustration. Enter the Mechaneu, an intricate and intriguing kinetic object that comes fully assembled and features 64 interlocking gears. The Mechaneu takes full advantage of these materials by providing a system of layered gears as well as a surface texture that mimics many natural patterns and stimulates the mind. The object is simultaneously porous and solid and moves entirely based on its own internal logic and 5-3 gear ratio. ”In nature shape is cheap and energy is expensive. Nature solves many problems through shape alone, using material only where needed and taking out where unnecessary,” said designer Toru Hasegawa. This is one of the first times that so much thought has been put into its physical execution. 3D printing, particularly in certain materials such as Polished Strong and Flexible plastic, has a capacity for incorporating detail that has yet to be explored except by an intrepid few. Building brilliant shapes will continue to be the focus of the artists at Proxy as they work with 3D design software (the same, they say, that is used for designing buildings), so one day the current model, which retails for $198.95, might be replaced with a version that is cheaper or tougher. “Something happens between the hand and the brain when you pick up the object and start to engage the gears. It taps into a fundamental desire to see our actions multiplied and intensified,” wrote Mark Collins, a designer and partner in the...

read more

Turning fairytale to reality 3d-printing

Posted by on Dec 11, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on Turning fairytale to reality 3d-printing

Turning a Fairy Tale into Reality through 3D Printing (Robots)  BY DAVIDE SHER ON TUE, DECEMBER 10, 2013 · 3D PRINTING,EDUCATION, INDUSTRY NEWS, INTERVIEWS, MAKERS, VIDEOS ADD COMMENT When we think about 3D printing the boundaries of what is real tend to thin out a bit. Virtual becomes physical, so objects from virtual worlds can enter the physical realm. It is happening already with video games such as Minecraft or Spore and it is happening through the thousands of ideas that become physical objects on Shapeways, Thingiverse, Cubify or iMaterialise. But what of fairy tales? If 3D printing makes virtual objects become real, can it do the same with fantasies? Apparently it can and a new children’s book titled “LEO the Maker Prince” is exploring how a fairytale about 3D printing can, in fact, make fantasy objects and characters become real. In a way 3D printing is the “stuff of dreams”, the perfect subject for a fairytale as it gives people the ultimate power: creating what they want. The magic wand and alchemy all in one (robotic) machine. Written by Carla Diana, a “technology-focused product designer with a particular interest for 3D printing”, LEO the Maker Prince teaches children about the (real) possibilities of 3D printing by following LEO – a walking, talking 3D printing robot – and Carla around different neighborhoods in Brooklyn, NY, meeting people, who tell them about how 3D printing helped them in their lives and jobs, as well as other robots with special 3D printing abilities. While LEO can 3D print with plastic, Hi-Ho prints with metal and Sinclair has access to infinite databases of designs. Others can even 3D print food. So in a way the book already transcends reality by placing events in a very “real” setting such as Brooklyn, a central hub of the American maker movement, and telling its readers about the very “real” possibilities of 3D printing. Through 3D printing, however, the story can venture into a new dimension by making the objects described in the book “really” real. Children can print them by visiting the LEO the Maker Prince page on Brooklyn based Makerbot’s Thingiverse network. They can also find other models mentioned in the book on Shapeways and iMaterialise and print them at home, while learning to master the tools they will use growing up. Make Magazine founder Dale Dougherty, who is also offering LEO the Maker Prince through its makezine.com website, was particularly enthusiastic about the possibilities explored by the book and personally interviewed Carla Diana (see the full interview below). His enthusiasm is understandable: mass 3D printing adoption will fulfill its potential especially through those who today are children and will grow up considering this amazing technology to be the norm. This “creative native generation” will have the power to really change the world and this time it might not be just another fairy...

read more

GE Turns to 3D Printers for Plane Parts

Posted by on Dec 3, 2013 in Blog | Comments Off on GE Turns to 3D Printers for Plane Parts

GE Turns to 3D Printers for Plane Parts Courtesy of GE Aviation The GE90 is one of the world’s most powerful jet engines. GE plans to produce 100,000 3D-printed components for the next-generation GE9X and Leap models  General Electric (GE), on the hunt for ways to build more than 85,000 fuel nozzles for its new Leap jet engines, is making a big investment in 3D printing. Usually the nozzles are assembled from 20 different parts. Also known as additive manufacturing, 3D printing can create the units in one metal piece, through a successive layering of materials. The process is more efficient and can be used to create designs that can’t be made using traditional techniques, GE says. The finished product is stronger and lighter than those made on the assembly line and can withstand the extreme temperatures (up to 2,400F) inside an engine. There’s just one problem: Today’s industrial 3D printers don’t have enough capacity to handle GE’s production needs, which require faster, higher-quality output at a lower cost. Courtesy GE AviationEach Leap engine will contain 19 metal 3D-printed fuel nozzles. The part is lighter and more durable than traditional parts “With today’s technology, it would take too many machines,” as many as 60 to 70, to efficiently make the nozzles, says Greg Morris, business development leader for additive manufacturing at GE Aviation. Morris joined the aerospace company last year, as part of GE’s acquisition of his 3D company, Morris Technologies. “We can start ramping up with the current generation of technology, but within two to three years we’re going to have to be onto the next generation to meet our cost targets,” he says. So GE is waiting for development of new printers with three to four times the capacity. As part of a $3.5 billion investment in its aerospace supply chain, GE says it will spend tens of millions of dollars to invest in new technology and, over the next five years, triple the size of its 70-person 3D-printing staff and expand its factory floor fourfold. (The 85,000 nozzles are for engine orders that will enter full production in late 2015.) Video: 3D Printed Cars a Reality? Take a Ride in One The company’s embrace of 3D printing throws the weight of the world’s largest jet-engine maker behind a process invented in the 1980s to fabricate scale models. As the technology has advanced, 3D printing has evolved. Today, Boeing (BA) uses the process to make plastic air-conditioning ducts for its 787 Dreamliner jet, and Nike (NKE) has a football cleat made on 3D printers. “[GE’s] investment changes everything, and it’s also unprecedented,” says Terry Wohlers, president of 3D printing consulting company Wohlers Associates. The company’s annual report tracking 3D technology estimates that the industry is poised to almost triple, to about $6 billion in sales, by 2017. Sales of 3D printers and related services rose 29 percent in 2012, to $2.2 billion, according to Wohlers. They’re on track to keep rising as GE, Siemens (SI), and Rolls-Royce (RR/:LN) among others invest in industrial-grade systems capable of producing metal parts. Demand from the aerospace industry alone is driving huge growth, Credit Suisse Group (CS) said in a Sept. 17 note. That’s creating opportunities for companies such as 3D Systems (DDD), the largest maker of 3D printers in the...

read more